Tag Archives: business class

The Milelion’s RTW Trip 2017: JAL Skysuite Business Class NRT-LAX Review

Introduction: It’s the most wonderful time of the year
A Tale of Two Lounges: SATS Premier T2 and the Qantas SIN Lounge
Malaysia Airlines B737 Business Class SIN-KUL
Malaysia Airlines Business Class Golden Lounge KUL
Malaysia Airlines A330  Business Class KUL-NRT
Japan Airlines Business Class Sakura Lounge NRT
Japan Airlines B77W Business Class NRT-LAX
The Westin LAX
The Westin Westminster
Aloft Boston Seaport
The Consolidated AA Domestic First Class Experience
American Airlines Flagship Lounge JFK
American Airlines B772 Business Class JFK-LHR
American Airlines Arrivals Lounge LHR
The Great Northern Hotel, London
Sheraton Grand London Park Lane
Westin Paris Vendome
Courtyard by Marriott Madrid Princesa
Four Points by Sheraton Barcelona Diagonal
The Consolidated Intra-Europe Business Class Experience
Sheraton Casablanca
The Casablanca Lounge CMN
Royal Air Maroc B737 Business Class CMN-ACC
Labadi Beach Hotel, Accra
Ethiopian Airlines B772 Business Class ACC-ADD
Ethiopian Airlines Cloud 9 Business Class Lounge ADD
Ethiopian Airlines B737 Business Class ADD-DAR
Protea Hotel by Marriott Dar Es Salaam Courtyard
Tanzanite Lounge DAR
Qatar Airways A320 Business Class DAR-DOH
Westin Doha
Qatar Airways Al Safwa First Class Lounge DOH
Qatar Airways A350 “First” Class DOH-DXB
The Grosvenor House Dubai
W Doha
Qatar Airways B772 Business Class DOH-BLR
The Ritz Carlton Bangalore
Cathay Dragon Lounge Bangalore
Cathay Dragon A330 Business Class BLR-HKG
W Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific’s HKG Lounges
Cathay Pacific A350 Business Class HKG-SIN


JAL 62 was running 30 minutes late due to the “late arrival of the aircraft”. This was very unlike Japanese efficiency.

Nonetheless, it gave me time to snap some photos of the 777W taking us to LAX. Most of them turned out horrible. Here’s the only decent one. It was a gloomy day.

Eventually boarding was called, and I got my first look at JAL’s Skysuite product.

First things first- JAL has a 2-3-2 configuration in business class on its 777W aircraft. I know what you’re thinking: 7 abreast in business class? That’s quite a squeeze isn’t it?

Short answer is yes, if you’re a big fat guy. But I’m svelte that way, and if anything the high density layout almost reminded me of capsule hotels in Japan. I know that’s not the most flattering comparison to make, but as you’ll see I really did like the seat.

The 3 seats in the middle are arranged in a staggered format, so at least the guy in the middle doesn’t feel so awkward. You’ll also note that there are high privacy dividers between each seat that go up in flight, so you won’t need to see much of your seatmates if you don’t want to.

The staggered format also means that each seat has direct aisle access (the dude in the middle goes through the narrow passageway infront of each row of 3)

Now that passageway is quite tight, and I wonder whether it gets awkward for…passengers of size.

But never mind them. This is what the 2 seats at the side look like

I normally don’t spring for the window seat because I want direct aisle access, but this is the exception. The window seats in this configuration are the most lucrative because there’s a ridiculous amount of privacy. Once that divider goes up, you’re in a suite all by yourself and the high walls make it very hard for looky loo passerbys to see inside.

To even talk to you, the stewardess has to navigate this narrow passageway.

How much privacy do you get from your seatmate when the barrier is down (as it needs to be during taxi takeoff and landing)? It’s still decent- the staggered config means you won’t see his/her face, but you will see their legs.

To give you another idea of how the staggering looks like, this is what the view is if you sit at the front of your window suite and look back.

This seat definitely can’t compete with the SQ product for width, but thanks to the staggered configuration it’s not as punishingly narrow as other high density business class configurations (ahem BA ahem)

Any further questions about the seat? Read the manual

Each seat had a pair of slippers, blanket, amenity kit and pair of headphones waiting.

The seat controls on the side panel were a little worn but still worked perfectly. There is a massage function in the seat. That up and down symbol you see on the right? That’s to raise and lower the privacy divider. I only realised that after trying to manually force the divider up. D’oh.

The privacy divider, when fully raised, is a majestic thing. It removes the need for social interaction.

There’s in seat power (this plug type is a bit different, it doesn’t accept Singapore plugs without an adapter) and USB charging.

As weird as it sounds, one of my favourite features of the seat was that someone had finally solved the first world problem of “my meal is on my tray so I can’t go to the loo”. JAL’s tray rotates sideways, giving you enough room to squeeze out at the side! Incredible.

The amenities kit is Zero Haliburton branded. It has lip balm, ear plugs, a toothbrush kit, eyeshades, socks and a packet of tissues. I was surprised there wasn’t any hand sanitizer, given how obsessive the Japanese are about hygiene. Nor was there a face mask, for that matter.

The amenity kit was definitely nicer than what rival ANA has to offer in business class

Image result for ana amenities kit business class
photo credit: pointsnews

Slippers are slippers.

This picture below sums up what I thought was one of the strangest contradictions about JAL. The earphones are high quality (if not slightly uncomfortable because of their on-ear rather than around-ear design) noise-cancelling Sony models. The amenities kit is Zero Haliburton, which by all accounts is a great brand. So why is the pre-departure drink served in a plastic cup? That’s just undercutting everything.

A  glance out the window reminded me it was still storming outside. I wondered if that was delaying departure, because by this time we were 1 hour past the original scheduled departure time.

The captain came on the PA to apologise for the delay. He said that we were now set for pushback and they’d try to make up for the time en route.

What’s interesting is that it was gloomy and raining at Narita, but once the engines spooled up and we climbed to cruising altitude-

Just beautiful. This is why we fly.

Now let’s get to the even better stuff: the catering. Menus were distributed after takeoff. I l am digging the all black motif.

All menu photos can be enlarged by clicking on them

There was a choice of Japanese and Western dinners.

The anytime snack menu, which looks amazing in and of itself. I really, really wanted to try the pasta carbonara but unfortunately/fortunately I slept too much. JAL doesn’t have any ramen tie-up the way ANA has with Ippudo.

There was a light meal served before landing, again Japanese/Western.

The chamapgne on offer was Delamotte. Not many people know that this nondescript brand’s sister is the very descript Salon.

Yes, this Salon, which is served in First Class

Image result for salon champagne japan airlines

There was also the usual assortment of everything else. Sake fans, take note.

If I were nitpicky, I’d say the crew took a bit too long to start dinner service. I get that it’s a higher density configuration with more mouths to feed, but there should be a corresponding scaling up of flight crew. Dinner service started about 90 minutes after takeoff, but for me the gold standard on a flight like this would be 60 minutes. At least that’s what I’ve experienced on SQ. It does help maximise rest. But enough of that, because the food was so good I’d have gladly waited longer.

The amuse bouche was sesame tofu with wasabi, and fresh cheese and tomato mousse. I normally don’t like any of these ingredients, but whatever Chef Chikara Yamada did made them work collectively.

And the starter was beautiful to behold. Even on ANA I’ve never seen packaging and presentation like this.

The Spring Haze selection came wrapped in a small wooden box. Unwrapping it unveiled an exquisite selection  of Japanese treats

I like how the menu’s layout intuitively explained what each dish was.

Sidenote: I have never had sashimi on a plane. I always assumed this wouldn’t be possible because of hygiene concerns, but apparently it can be done. And the tuna was amazing.

That set the scene well for the main course of Japanese style beef steak and grilled salmon.

And you’re going to have to let me gush about the rice because I love rice. This was the best rice I have ever had on a plane. As per the menu, this is Yukigura Imazurimai Koshihikari rice, characterized by freshness, stickiness and sweetness. I want more.

Desert was a jetblack kudzu starch cake flavored with black sesame. I poked at it with my spoon and asked the stewardess for the Dean and Deluca “super premium” vanilla ice cream.

It was exquisitely rich. I think I have never had vanilla ice cream this good. Trust me, I know vanilla ice cream. I went to a famous ice cream store in Margaret River, strolled up to the counter and asked for Vanilla. The counter staff felt obliged to give me a free scoop of some more exotic flavor, because in his words “that’s a long way you’ve come for just vanilla”. I thanked him and gave the free scoop to my mum later, scraping off as much as I could so the vanilla didn’t get ruined.

After my meal I had time to fiddle around with the IFE. For me, JAL’s IFE is a thumbs down. The system was buggy, and froze up frequently before having to be reset.

Thales partners Android! Who knew

And then it defaulted to Japanese, and there was no easy way of changing it to English.

I know what you guys are thinking- don’t be noob, just go to settings.  Well, the settings menu didn’t have a language function. And even though everything else was in Japanese, the settings menu defaulted to English, for whatever reason.

The other confusing thing is that apparently you control the IFE system from your handheld controller, and only after you’ve done your selection does the image get thrown to the big screen. At least that was my experience. I couldn’t scroll through the entertainment options on the big screen, I had to do everything from the handheld controller before “transferring” the image to the big screen as the final step.

There were other cool features in the IFE that didn’t seem to be activated- one of which was the ability to order meals and drinks. The window seat is great for privacy, but the upshot of that is it’s harder to flag the stewardesses in the aisle. I mean, you could always press the call button but this system would have been much more efficient.

I watched Moana, one of my to watch films. Did you know that when it was released the PC brigade went nuts about its portrayal of Polynesians as obese? I mean, Maui/Dwayne Johnson isn’t obese, he’s wicked powerful. Seriously, some people are just looking to be offended.

There were several news channels available, but none of them were live. I switched over to the BBC. Watching the news reminded me how much evil, pain and suffering there was in the world.

After a while I decided it was time to wash up for bed. The JAL bathrooms aren’t anything fancy, apart from the almost mandatory bidet you find in Japan.

In fact, their loos are probably less impressive than ANA’s given the lack of any branded soaps or fragrances, the type you’ll usually find in any good airline lav.

No PJs are provided for business class passengers, which I guess I can’t really hold against them as it’s not become the norm (yet). I put the seat into bed mode, which as you’d expect is a 180 degree flat bed.

As it turns out, there is a special sleeping mattress available, which I almost missed out on because it wasn’t in my overhead bin. I got a passing stewardess to help me with this and she was really surprised my overhead bin was lacking one, which suggests some oversight on their part.

I’m glad I got the padding, because it made a world of difference. JAL takes the bed padding seriously, partnering with airweave to deliver a top quality mattress pad. There’s a great article on Runway Girl Network about what airlines are doing with respect to bedding that you might be interested in.

I mean, if it’s good enough for these guys…

I was woken up 90 minutes before landing for the breakfast meal. I have to be honest, after the amazing dinner I had everything else would be a step down.

The beef provided was chewy, and with that as the centerpiece of the dish it never rose above average.

FYI, this was “sauteed wagyu beef fillet and mugwort (what’s that?) flavored fu, citrius flavored sesame sauce and smoked tofu.  Should have had the carbonara…

The crew came around to distribute paper customs forms before landing (which I don’t need, thanks to my newfangled Global Entry) and we landed about an hour late.

Conclusion

So, how does JAL measure up in my mind? The catering (average breakfast aside) is really on a whole different level. I would put that dinner in the top 3 (if not the very top) of all meals I’ve ever had on a plane. I’m not exaggerating when I say it redefined what airline dining could be for me.

Similarly, the quality of the hard product is impressive. The privacy I had in that window seat was excellent, and the bedding they provide is up there with the very best.

I would say that ANA has the edge when it comes to service, as I felt the ANA attendants had a better grasp of English and were generally more friendly. It’s also very difficult to beat a 1-2-1 configuration the likes of which ANA has in business class, and if push came to shove I would still go for ANA’s hard product, albeit narrowly.

I think the main takeaway is that Japan has 2 fantastic airlines and you can’t go too far wrong choosing either of them.

The Milelion’s RTW Trip 2017: Malaysia Airlines A330 Business Class KUL-NRT

Introduction: It’s the most wonderful time of the year
A Tale of Two Lounges: SATS Premier T2 and the Qantas SIN Lounge
Malaysia Airlines B737 Business Class SIN-KUL
Malaysia Airlines Business Class Golden Lounge KUL
Malaysia Airlines A330  Business Class KUL-NRT
Japan Airlines Business Class Sakura Lounge NRT
Japan Airlines B77W Business Class NRT-LAX
The Westin LAX
The Westin Westminster
Aloft Boston Seaport
The Consolidated AA Domestic First Class Experience
American Airlines Flagship Lounge JFK
American Airlines B772 Business Class JFK-LHR
American Airlines Arrivals Lounge LHR
The Great Northern Hotel, London
Sheraton Grand London Park Lane
Westin Paris Vendome
Courtyard by Marriott Madrid Princesa
Four Points by Sheraton Barcelona Diagonal
The Consolidated Intra-Europe Business Class Experience
Sheraton Casablanca
The Casablanca Lounge CMN
Royal Air Maroc B737 Business Class CMN-ACC
Labadi Beach Hotel, Accra
Ethiopian Airlines B772 Business Class ACC-ADD
Ethiopian Airlines Cloud 9 Business Class Lounge ADD
Ethiopian Airlines B737 Business Class ADD-DAR
Protea Hotel by Marriott Dar Es Salaam Courtyard
Tanzanite Lounge DAR
Qatar Airways A320 Business Class DAR-DOH
Westin Doha
Qatar Airways Al Safwa First Class Lounge DOH
Qatar Airways A350 “First” Class DOH-DXB
The Grosvenor House Dubai
W Doha
Qatar Airways B772 Business Class DOH-BLR
The Ritz Carlton Bangalore
Cathay Dragon Lounge Bangalore
Cathay Dragon A330 Business Class BLR-HKG
W Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific’s HKG Lounges
Cathay Pacific A350 Business Class HKG-SIN


After the double tragedies of MH17 and MH370, Malaysia Airlines tapped Christoph Muller to turn around the fortunes of the company. Muller, the then-CEO of Aer Lingus who had revived the struggling airline, was appointed CEO in May 2015.

Image result for christoph mueller

Muller went about initiating a raft of changes at MAS. He laid off 30% of the MAS workforce, retired their entire fleet of 777s, dissolved the parent company and transferred all assets to a new one and announced a new partnership with Emirates to tompang their long haul routes

Unfortunately, the changes he made weren’t too popular and led to his resignation (slash forcing out) in April 2016, barely a year after taking the helm.

But Muller’s legacy at the company lives on through its new business class product. In November 2015, Muller decided to replace the A330’s angled flat beds in favor of “a world-class leading lie-flat seat… positioned above the industry standard for business class.”

MAS Old A330 Business Class

Now, whether or not the new seat is truly world class is up for debate, but it’s undoubtedly better than the old one. And it made sense, given that with the retirements of the 777s and the A380s  (well, as soon as they can find a buyer that is) from MAS’s fleet, the A330s would now become the de facto flagships.

MAS New A330 Business Class

The first of these refurbished A330 aircraft was delivered in April 2016, with the other 14 refitted by September 2016, incredibly fast by any airline’s standards.

The press photos for these new seat look great, but how do they hold up in real life? And how good is the overall MAS inflight experience? After my extremely underwhelming lounge experience, I was hoping the onboard service could salvage things.

MAS’s new A330 business class cabin is a 1-2-1 configuration in some rows and a 2-2-2 configuration in others. Confused? You might be if you looked at the seatmap on MAS, which seems to show 1-2-2 in all rows

Seatguru’s map is more useful in this respect, as it shows exactly which rows are 1-2-1 and which are 2-2-2

You can see that the really desirable seats are 1K, 4K and 6K as these are throne style seats with double armrests and a lot of space. Failing which, any of the A seats are alright choices, with the ones in even rows offering more privacy as the armrest is on the aisle side. The seats you don’t want to get are the H and K ones in rows 2, 4 and 7 because you’ll not have a lot of private space from your neighbour.

I had snagged 4K a month or so ago, and when boarding was called rushed down the jetway to get shots of the empty cabin.

My seat 4K. Well actually this was 6K. In my giddy enthusiasm I overshot my seat by 2 rows. But you can see the throne configuration here, with ample space to your left and right. Also note the 2 seats together behind 6K, with the window seat lacking direct aisle access. Perhaps those seats are better for couples travelling together, but solo travellers beware.

Now here is 4K proper.

The seat is surprisingly narrow for a 1-2-1 configuration, but like I mentioned you have a lot of storage space.

Here’s a reverse shot of the 2 seats together. I’m glad the designers didn’t go with Lufthansa’s footsie style seating. Here your legs go firmly into their own compartment, as do your seatmate’s.

There is ample legroom, but do note that the throne seat gets narrow towards the front. You can see the tight squeeze here.

Seat controls were on the side panel and straightforward enough. There’s a massage function if you’re into that sort of thing.

There was also a second set of seat controls in your armrest.

Full view of the side panel, showing the reading light plus mesh storage space. Also note the USB charging port and the IFE remote.

Each seat has in-seat power

And numerous nooks and crannies to put your stuff. Unfortunately not all said nooks and crannies were clean. There was some gunk at the bottom of this one, for instance

There’s a side panel with more storage and a mirror.

A storage bin in the shoulder of your seat

And even a small one beneath the TV. What this one was for I have no idea.

MAS has a very nice amenities kit in business class, by Porsche Design.

The amenities kit has something that I think all amenities should have but very few do: hand sanitizer. The hypochondriac in me can’t stand to touch anything in the plane without cleaning my hands, and although I always bring a bottle with me it never hurts to have more.

Other treats include mouthwash, a toothbrush kit, socks, eye shades, lip balm and moisturizer. Surprisingly earplugs are not included, but these are available on request from the crew.

Although MAS has upgraded its amenities kit, it sadly has ignored the headphones. The plasticky set provided were woeful at best. You’re better off using your own.

The crew were generally friendly and addressed all passengers by name, which should be the standard in business class but unfortunately isn’t on a lot of airlines (SQ is by far the most consistent in getting their crews to memorize passenger names)

After takeoff they came around to distribute menus. There were separate ones for drinks and food.

MAS’s meal service on this flight made no sense to me. Satay would be served after take off, then before arrival breakfast would be served. Given the total flight time on this red-eye flight was about 6.5 hours, it seemed nonsensical to cut into passenger rest like this. Why not do a chop chop meal service after takeoff and leave the passengers undisturbed until descent? Or go lights off immediately after take off and wake passengers before arrival for breakfast? With this arrangement, you’d be disturbing passengers twice on what was already a short-ish flight.

The crew came around to serve drinks before satay. I had a glass of Duval Leroy, not my favourite brand of champagne (he said, like he could tell the difference). MAS used to serve Cattier champagne, but both these brands are generally low end. I believe I’ve seen Duval Leroy as low as $49 on sale in Singapore.

And the food? Well, having heard so much about the famous satay, I have to say I was disappointed.

The meat itself (beef and chicken) wasn’t bad. Nice char and tender still on the inside. The peanut sauce was watery beyond belief.

Since they weren’t serving the Before Landing meal until, well, before landing, they came around to offer items from the snack menu. I had a bowl of noodles, which is basically instant noodles with some garnishing.

It was well into the second hour of the flight before they finished everything, and I made a beeline for the loo to brush my teeth before sleeping.

The loo has Acca Kappa toiletries, for those of you who care about that kind of thing.

I returned to my seat and put it into bed mode for the night. The seat, as you’d expect, is full flat.

A passing crewmember helped me put the bedsheet on the seat, which made the bed look a bit nicer.

I slept just fine on the seat but people with big feet (and we all know what that means) may find the cubby hole a tight squeeze. I sleep on my back for what it’s worth, and although you definitely get aware of the confined space if you try to wriggle your feet, it didn’t bother me too much.

I was woken by the crew about an hour before landing. Before going to bed, the crew asked me if I wanted to be woken for breakfast and I told them as late as possible please. I’m glad they remembered my request, because sleep on this flight was already at a premium. I think the rest of the cabin was woken up 90 mins prior.

Fruit was served first.

Where the main course was concerned, Malaysia Airlines has their own version of Book the Cook that they call Chef on Call.

However, none of the options looked particularly attractive to me, so I didn’t bother pre-ordering. For what it’s worth, my colleague pre-ordered the cod and said it was terrible.

I went with the Japanese option of miso salmon, rice and veggies. It wasn’t good. The rice was mush (it is possible to do good rice on airplanes. When you read my JAL trip report you’ll understand how amazing rice can be) and the veggies were mush.

Before landing I got hit by one of my sneezing fits. I asked the crew for some tissues and they obliged by bringing me the whole box. Make all the kleenex jokes you want, but I appreciate the generosity. This is the equivalent of the flight attendant giving you the full can.

We landed slightly late in Narita and the crew thanked us for joining them today.

So- overall thoughts. MAS’s new hard product is definitely competitive, but not market leading (1-2-1 all aisle access is still the gold standard). These days, a flat bed in J is the bare minimum requirement for any red-eye flight, and at least MAS now has that across its A330 fleet (c/f SQ which is still going angled flat on regional routes).

The crew were great, friendly and knew their stuff, but unfortunately the standard of the catering left a lot to be desired.

Malaysia Airlines does frequent fare deals where you can get great business class fares (Tokyo for S$1,070 round trip J anyone?), so keep your eyes peeled for future sales.

The Milelion’s RTW Trip 2017: MAS B737 Business Class SIN-KUL

Introduction: It’s the most wonderful time of the year
A Tale of Two Lounges: SATS Premier T2 and the Qantas SIN Lounge
Malaysia Airlines B737 Business Class SIN-KUL
Malaysia Airlines Business Class Golden Lounge KUL
Malaysia Airlines A330  Business Class KUL-NRT
Japan Airlines Business Class Sakura Lounge NRT
Japan Airlines B77W Business Class NRT-LAX
The Westin LAX
The Westin Westminster
Aloft Boston Seaport
The Consolidated AA Domestic First Class Experience
American Airlines Flagship Lounge JFK
American Airlines B772 Business Class JFK-LHR
American Airlines Arrivals Lounge LHR
The Great Northern Hotel, London
Sheraton Grand London Park Lane
Westin Paris Vendome
Courtyard by Marriott Madrid Princesa
Four Points by Sheraton Barcelona Diagonal
The Consolidated Intra-Europe Business Class Experience
Sheraton Casablanca
The Casablanca Lounge CMN
Royal Air Maroc B737 Business Class CMN-ACC
Labadi Beach Hotel, Accra
Ethiopian Airlines B772 Business Class ACC-ADD
Ethiopian Airlines Cloud 9 Business Class Lounge ADD
Ethiopian Airlines B737 Business Class ADD-DAR
Protea Hotel by Marriott Dar Es Salaam Courtyard
Tanzanite Lounge DAR
Qatar Airways A320 Business Class DAR-DOH
Westin Doha
Qatar Airways Al Safwa First Class Lounge DOH
Qatar Airways A350 “First” Class DOH-DXB
The Grosvenor House Dubai
W Doha
Qatar Airways B772 Business Class DOH-BLR
The Ritz Carlton Bangalore
Cathay Dragon Lounge Bangalore
Cathay Dragon A330 Business Class BLR-HKG
W Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific’s HKG Lounges
Cathay Pacific A350 Business Class HKG-SIN


It’s hard to imagine that up until 2008 the SIN-KUL route was effectively a duopoly, with MAS and SQ operating more than 85% of the 200 flights a week (the rest were provided by a hodgepodge of airlines exercising fifth freedom rights like Air India and JAL). Round trip fares were upwards of S$300.

Then Tony Fernandes and Air Asia lobbied hard to get the route liberalized to competition, and in Feb 2008, AK123 carried just over 200 passengers about 50 minutes from KL to Singapore. Tony Fernandes himself attended the media scrum wearing a red T-shirt with “Finally!” emblazoned on it. And why not? It had been a long time, too long, in the making. The original agreement which granted virtual exclusivity on the SIN-KUL route to SQ/MAS has been preserved since 1974.

Fast forward 9 years, and you can get a round trip ticket on Tigerair from SIN-KUL for as low as S$64. Nope, that’s not a typo.

The SIN-KUL route now carries 2.7 million passengers, most of them on budget flights. Looking back, it’s hard to believe that once upon a long time ago, SQ and MAS actually operated First Class on the SIN-KUL route. I wonder what the meal service on that would have looked like…

These days, the highest class of service available on the SIN-KUL route is business class, which I was booked on with MAS today. The inbound aircraft was delayed about 40 minutes, resulting in a similar delay in departure from Singapore.

Priority boarding was announced for oneworld Emerald and Sapphire members, MAS elite frequent flyers and business class passengers. In reality everyone just sort of streamed forth in a human scrum, frustrated with the delay

I boarded the aircraft and saw that I was flying on one of MAS’s new 737s. These have IFE and in seat power, along with cabin mood lighting and Boeing’s next generation interior. My colleague, who was on the later 9.15pm flight, got an old 737 which had none of these.

The four rows of seats in business class are plenty wide and are similar to domestic first class in the USA.

Each seat had a pillow and paper thin blanket.  Legroom was more than adequate.

I again lucked out in that the seat next to me was empty.

There was an IFE controller in each armrest, although the IFE screen was also touch sensitive.

Seat controls were basic, and manual. You could move the seat back up and down, or you could move the legrest up and down. Both required upper body strength, something I do not excel in.

As mentioned, each seat had a USB charging outlet and an EMpower plug.

The entertainment selection actually isn’t half bad. There were some first run movies with a solid back catalog. In any case, the flight time from Singapore to KL doesn’t even let you finish watching one movie.

There is one forward loo shared by all the business class passengers. It was kept clean and tidy throughout the (admittedly short) flight.

Shortly after takeoff, the drinks cart came around, but in addition to that they also offered a choice of meals. I was amazed that they served any refreshments on this flight, much less hot refreshments, much less something that could approximate a meal service on other airlines.

The chicken with rice dish that I had really wasn’t very appetizing (as you’ll see in the KUL-NRT leg, catering isn’t something that MAS excels at), but I was just marveling at how they managed to do a meal service in such a short time.

True enough, no sooner had I taken 4 bites of the meal than the captain came on the PA and announced the commencement of descent into KLIA.

I was now in MAS’s backyard, and quite eager to see what their flagship lounge would be like. That turned out to be, as you’ll see, somewhat of a disappointment.